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Amethyst- a very popular gemstone

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Amethyst is one of the most popular gems, and has been considered since antiquity as a valuable gemstone. Its name derives from the Greek "amethystos", which meant "not drunken", as Amethyst in antiquity was thought to ward off drunkenness. In ancient times, Amethyst was highly regarded among the precious gemstones like Ruby and Emerald, but findings of vast Amethyst reserves in the last 200 years have made Amethyst fairly inexpensive and obtainable. Amethyst colors range from light to dark purple, and the transparent deep purple colors are the most highly regarded. Amethyst is the purple variety of the mineral Quartz, and is its most famous and valuable gem variety. Quartz also contains other gemstones such as Citrine, Rose Quartz, and Smoky Quartz. Amethyst is often heat-treated to deepen the color, or to transform it into Citrine. Some varieties may also change to a light green color, which is also used as a gemstone and given the trade name Prasiolite, or "Green Amethyst". Amethyst, although always purple, comes from many different mining sources of which many produce a unique color or style. For example, Uruguay Amethyst has a distinct color and style, as does Amethyst from Arizona. Amethyst from the ancient sources in Russia, colloquially known as "Siberian Amethyst" is deeply colored Amethyst from deposits that have long since been exhausted and therefore command a higher price. Some dealers may sell deeply colored Amethyst from other locations as "Siberian Amethyst" to command a higher price. African Amethyst is generally more deeply colored than South American Amethyst, and the name "African Amethyst" may also be used to describe a deeper color stone even if it didn't originate in Africa. The color distribution of Amethyst is sometimes uneven, and this is often taken to account when cutting a stone. Some Amethyst from certain locations will slightly fade in color upon prolonged exposure to light, and one should always question a dealer about this before purchasing an Amethyst gem. Care should also be taken with Amethyst as it is known to form curve shaped fractures if banged too hard. Amethyst can come in huge flawless crystals, and gems of all sizes have been cut. Although Amethyst sources are abundant, synthetic gems are also produced using the hydrothermal method. A natural mixture of purple Amethyst and golden Citrine has been coined with name "Ametrine". (See the Ametrine gemstone page for more details.)


USES

Amethyst is faceted into many cuts, and is used in all forms of jewelry. Many large gems of Amethyst weighing several hundred carats have been cut. Tumbled beads of Amethyst mixed with white Quartz are also used as necklaces and bracelets.

Amethyst is the birthstone of February.

 

 

 


VARIETIES Brazilian Amethyst - Amethyst from Brazil, but may also refer to any South American Amethyst. Bolivian Amethyst - Amethyst from the South American country of Bolivia. Siberian Amethyst - Originally describing deeply colored Amethyst from Siberia in Russia. Now incorrectly used to describe any deeply colored Amethyst. African Amethyst - Amethyst from the continent of Africa, often signifying deeply colored Amethyst. Green Amethyst - Light green Quartz colored by artificially heat-treating certain types of Amethyst. Also known as "Prasiolite".
AMETHYST SOURCES

Brazilian Amethyst - Amethyst from Brazil, but may also refer to any South American Amethyst.  Bolivian Amethyst - Amethyst from the South American country of Bolivia.  Siberian Amethyst - Originally describing deeply colored Amethyst from Siberia in Russia. Now incorrectly used to describe any deeply colored Amethyst.  African Amethyst - Amethyst from the continent of Africa, often signifying deeply colored Amethyst.  Green Amethyst - Light green Quartz colored by artificially heat-treating certain types of Amethyst. Also known as "Prasiolite".


SIMILAR GEMSTONES The color of Amethyst is rather unique, and few gems are confused with it, especially in deeper shades. Purple Sapphire and Purple Spinel may be the same color of Amethyst, but these are both very rare and command extremely high prices. Iolite may also be similar but has a bluer hue. Fluorite can have the same color, but due to its softness is only used as a collectors gem. compliments of minerals.net

Browse our collection of Amethyst Jewelry


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